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What do Celtic Life and Canadian Geographic have in common?

The answer to that question, judging from the October issues of both magazines, would appear to be timeliness and excellent editorial taste. In Celtic Life, we discover a one-page Q&A in which Our Hero talks about his latest book: "Unearthing my own roots inspired me to conceive of what I call “cultural genealogy.” Canadian intellectuals hunker down with geographers and sociologists. That’s a mistake. We assume geography’s limitations and cease investigating our collective past at the western edge of the Atlantic Ocean. Instead, like genealogists, we should keep sleuthing. This nation’s history crosses the Atlantic. And, given that nine million Canadians trace their roots to Scotland and Ireland, it does so more often to those two countries than to anywhere else." In Canadian Geographic, we find this same chap talking once more about "cultural
genealogy, the idea that values and ideas can be transmitted from one generation and place to another. The figures in the book helped shape Scotland and Ireland, and their people, who brought their attitudes and beliefs to this country. Collectively, that history is part of Canadian history that we have long overlooked."
Ken McGoogan
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Before turning mainly to books about arctic exploration and Canadian history, Ken McGoogan worked for two decades as a journalist at major dailies in Toronto, Calgary, and Montreal. He teaches creative nonfiction writing through the University of Toronto and in the MFA program at King’s College in Halifax. Ken served as chair of the Public Lending Right Commission, has written recently for Canada’s History, Canadian Geographic, and Maclean’s, and sails with Adventure Canada as a resource historian. Based in Toronto, he has given talks and presentations across Canada, from Dawson City to Dartmouth, and in places as different as Edinburgh, Melbourne, and Hobart.